Graduate Courses

EAP 6110: Academic Writing & Research I for Graduate Students

3 hours per week, 3 credits

This course is designed specifically to provide foreign students with a solid foundation for graduate studies. The course introduces the organization and planning of academic papers that are coherent, cohesive, logical, and convincing. Activities throughout the course will help students develop an active academic vocabulary as well as accurate grammar and usage. The course also includes training in important academic skills such as skimming and scanning, summarization, evaluation of sources, conducting searches of reference materials, and use of documentation styles. The final assignment for EAP 6110 is a short academic research paper with an oral presentation.

Prerequisite: Placement into EAP 6110.

EAP 6110 is a 3-credit, 3-contact-hour course. However, it will not count toward a graduate degree in most fields in the University. To meet federal visa requirements for full-time status, graduate students in EAP 6110 must enroll in a minimum of six (6) credit hours of academic coursework (in addition to EAP 6110). See this page for the tuition rate.


EAP 6111: Academic Writing & Research II for Graduate Students

3 hours per week, 3 credits

Designed specifically for international students who demonstrate a high proficiency in English, EAP 6111 focuses on writing and research conventions governing academic discourse at the graduate and professional level. The course reviews and develops research skills with an emphasis on understanding the structure of, organizing, and writing research papers. Extensive coursework assists the development of knowledge of grammatical and syntactic patterns, as well as vocabulary and language structures common within graduate-level writing. The course guides students through first reviewing the foundational skills of working with sources (conducting library research, summarizing, paraphrasing, quoting, and citing), and then engaging in the process of writing an original research paper. To achieve these goals, students work with reading and writing tasks targeting key genres in U.S.-based graduate studies and engage in collegial classroom discussions that promote professional/discipline-specific awareness.

Prerequisite: Completion of EAP 6110, or placement into EAP 6111.

EAP 6111 is is a 3-credit, 3-contact-hour course. However, it will not count toward a graduate degree in most fields in the University. To meet federal visa requirements for full-time status, graduate students in EAP 6111 must enroll in a minimum of six (6) credit hours of academic coursework (in addition to EAP 6111). See this page for the tuition rate.


EAP 6000: Academic Communication

3 hours per week, 3 credits

EAP 6000 is designed to acclimate international students to the communicative expectations of graduate school at the George Washington University. It creates a safe classroom space where students gain confidence and communicative fluency in interacting with their professor and peers. Students will learn to navigate GW’s campus and access its resources, understand American classroom culture and its communicative expectations, and engage in social interactions on a variety of topics. Students’ academic skill set will be expanded through the development of listening and note-taking skills and the expansion of communicative vocabulary and structures, as well as through opportunities to lead class discussions and prepare and deliver both informal and formal presentations. Additional emphasis on developing multiliteracy through intercultural, multimedia, and visual communication. Specific communicative tasks and materials will be linked to students’ field of study when possible. See this page for the tuition rate.


EAP 6016: Academic Skills Workshop

Subtopic:  Grammar for Academic Writing 

Online, 1 credit

This academic skills course will scaffold international students' understanding and production of academic text, including grammar, sentence structure, use of transitional and cohesive devices, and incorporation of academic vocabulary. It will draw on corpus linguistics and other academically purposed approaches to building English language proficiency. It will be organized as a series of interactive learning modules with opportunities for review and self-study, as well as peer and professor interaction as students learn to produce academic prose that is increasingly accurate and sophisticated in its construction.