Graduate Courses

EAP 6110: Academic Writing & Research I for Graduate Students

3 hours per week, 3 credits

This course helps you become a more successful graduate student, as well as a better scholar and professional, by teaching you how to manage academic writing assignments in your graduate classes. You will study the genres (types) of academic written and oral communication you might encounter in your graduate studies. You will plan, write, and revise academic papers that are coherent, cohesive, logical, and convincing. You will learn how to use the GW library to search for relevant and reliable academic publications. Your writing will integrate these publications by summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting them, as well as by citing them using standard academic formats. Finally, you will build an academic English vocabulary and develop more accurate grammar and usage so that your readers can better understand your ideas.

Prerequisite: Placement into EAP 6110.

EAP 6110 is a 3-credit, 3-contact-hour course. However, it will not count toward a graduate degree in most fields in the University. To meet federal visa requirements for full-time status, graduate students in EAP 6110 must enroll in a minimum of six (6) credit hours of academic coursework (in addition to EAP 6110). See this page for the tuition rate.


EAP 6111: Academic Writing & Research II for Graduate Students

3 hours per week, 3 credits

Academic writing is nobody’s first language, which is why it can be a challenge to master even for native speakers. But the good news is that the conventions, rules, and rhetorical structures that guide academic writing are not arbitrary inventions; they exist in order to facilitate the research and analysis of practical and theoretical problems. In order to develop and evaluate solutions to such problems, we should approach writing tasks in a critical and organized manner and follow through the steps necessary for a successful outcome. By taking this course, you will be able to navigate the writing process and understand and recognize academic writing conventions. As a result, completing this course will prepare you to handle key writing assignments (such as but not limited to summary, article critique, report, data commentary, research paper) you will likely encounter in graduate school. Ultimately, this course will help strengthen your ability to be an effective communicator in your academic and professional communities.

Prerequisite: Completion of EAP 6110, or placement into EAP 6111.

EAP 6111 is is a 3-credit, 3-contact-hour course. However, it will not count toward a graduate degree in most fields in the University. To meet federal visa requirements for full-time status, graduate students in EAP 6111 must enroll in a minimum of six (6) credit hours of academic coursework (in addition to EAP 6111). See this page for the tuition rate.


EAP 6000: Academic Communication

3 hours per week, 3 credits

EAP 6000 is designed to acclimate international students to the communicative expectations of graduate school at the George Washington University. It creates a safe classroom space where students gain confidence and communicative fluency in interacting with their professor and peers. Students will learn to navigate GW’s campus and access its resources, understand American classroom culture and its communicative expectations, and engage in social interactions on a variety of topics. Students’ academic skill set will be expanded through the development of listening and note-taking skills and the expansion of communicative vocabulary and structures, as well as through opportunities to lead class discussions and prepare and deliver both informal and formal presentations. Additional emphasis on developing multiliteracy through intercultural, multimedia, and visual communication. Specific communicative tasks and materials will be linked to students’ field of study when possible. See this page for the tuition rate.


EAP 6016: Academic Skills Workshop

Subtopic:  Grammar for Academic Writing 

Online, 1 credit

This academic skills course will scaffold international students' understanding and production of academic text, including grammar, sentence structure, use of transitional and cohesive devices, and incorporation of academic vocabulary. It will draw on corpus linguistics and other academically purposed approaches to building English language proficiency. It will be organized as a series of interactive learning modules with opportunities for review and self-study, as well as peer and professor interaction as students learn to produce academic prose that is increasingly accurate and sophisticated in its construction.