English for Academic Purposes Program

English for Academic Purposes ProgramHoused in the Language Center, The GW English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Program serves enrolled students of GWU, both graduate and under-graduate, who are non-native speakers of English. The program teaches students the critical thinking, research and writing skills that form the basis of success in the academic and professional worlds.

In addition to the EAP Writing Support Program, the GW Writing Center conducts free, one-on-one sessions with undergraduate and graduate students to assist students with course writing assignments, research papers, theses, and personal statements.

 

Writing Support Program

The EAP Writing Support Program offers a free, one-on-one, service for GWU students with non-English backgrounds at the Language Center, Phillips Hall 210B during regular semesters. Our tutors are available during any stage of the writing process to work on audience, brainstorming, citation, drafting, evidence, grammar, organization and flow, outlining, paragraphing, revision, thesis, and tone. In addition they are trained to provide focused support for non-native speakers. Visit our appointment website to make an appointment.

An online comment box is now available for the EAP writing support program. Let us know about your visit and help us improve our program!

EAP Faculty Scholarship

 

Dr. Megan Siczek

 

§  Siczek, M. & Shapiro, S. (2014). Developing writing-intensive courses for a globalized curriculum through WAC-TESOL collaborations. In T.M. Zadwicki & M. Cox (Eds.), WAC and Second Language Writers: Research towards Linguistically and Culturally Inclusive Programs and Practices (pp. 329-346). Perspectives on Writing. Fort Collins, Colorado: The WAC Clearinghouse and Parlor Press.


§  Siczek, M. & Bennett, G. Incorporating academic vocabulary in first-year writing. Washington-area TESOL Fall 2014 Newsletter.


§  Siczek, M. & Bennett, G. (in press). Teaching lexico-grammatical features of academic language. In M. Roberge, K. Losey, & M. Wald (Eds.), Teaching U.S-educated multilingual writers:  Practices from and for the classroom. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.


§  Shapiro, S. & Siczek, M. (in press). Strategic content: How globally-oriented writing courses can bridge pedagogical and political spaces. In B. Smith & N. DeJoy (Eds.), Cross-language communication and the academy: Re-thinking orientations. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.


§  Siczek, M. (forthcoming). Developing global competency in U.S. higher education: Contributions of international students. CA-TESOL Journal


§  “Negotiating Socioacademic Space: International L2 Students’ Lived Experience in Mainstream College Writing Courses,” paper presentation at the American Association of Applied Linguistics (AAAL) conference, Toronto, ON, Canada, March 2015

§  “Making Sense: Interpreting U.S. Global Education Initiatives,” paper co-presention at the Comparative and International Education Society in Washington, DC, March 2015


§  “Transnational Mobility and International Students: Voices and Visions,” paper presentation at the World Educational Research Association (WERA) Focal Meeting in Edinburgh, Scotland, November 2014


§  “Global Education in U.S. Schools: The Interplay between Policy and Teacher Practice,” paper co-presentation at the World Educational Research Association (WERA) Focal Meeting in Edinburgh, Scotland, November 2014


§  “Strategic Content: How L2 Specialists Can Bridge Pedagogical and Political Spaces in Higher Education Through Globally-Oriented Writing Courses,” paper co-presentation at American Association of Applied Linguistics (AAAL) conference in Portland, OR, March 2014


§  “Encouraging Reflective Teaching in Composition Classrooms: Practice, Process, and Publication,” colloquium presentation at Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) conference in Portland, OR, March 2014


§  “Critical Reading Activities: Taking Students Beyond Simplistic Source Use,” colloquium presentation at TESOL conference in Portland, OR, March 2014


§  “Educating for Global Competence in the U.S.: The Interplay between Policy and Teacher Practice,” paper co-presentation at Comparative and International Education Society (CIES) conference in Toronto, ON, March 2014


§  “Internationalizing U.S. Schools: Where Do National Standards Fit In?” paper co-presentation at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) conference, San Francisco, CA, April 2013


§  "The Missing Link: Internationalization, Global Competency, and Inclusion in Higher Education," roundtable co-presentation at the AAAL Conference in Dallas, TX, March 2013


§  “Tapping into the Global: The Contribution of International Students,” colloquium presentation at TESOL International Conference in Dallas, TX, March 2013

 

Dr. Natalia Romanova

 

§  Romanova, N. (2015). Second Language Writing Development in a Study-Abroad Context. AAAL, Toronto, Canada

 

§  Jacobson, N., & Romanova, N. (2015). EAP to ESP: Using linguistic needs analysis to improve academic preparation for international graduate students in Statistics . AAAL, Toronto, Canada.

 

§  Romanova, N. (2013).  Gender and number agreement in L1 and L2 processing of Russian (with Gor, K.) Second Language Research Forum. Brigham Young University, USA.

 

§  Romanova, N. (2013).  Mechanisms underlying lexical access in native and second language processing of gender and number agreement (with Gor, K.). Cross-linguistic priming in bilinguals: Perspectives and constraints. Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherlands.